When is Chinese New Year?

Alevtina Rigonen
Alevtina Rigonen
December 5, 2012
When is Chinese New Year?

The new year is one of the most beloved holidays, it is widely celebrated in many countries of the world, and China is not an exception. But the most interesting thing is that in 1911, China began to live on the Gregorian calendar, which means that the new year begins there the same way as in all other countries of the world, on January 1. But along with the generally accepted new year, the Chinese celebrate the traditional new year. This tradition originates from ancient times, when China lived on a different calendar. Thus, in ancient times, the New Year in China was tied to the lunar calendar and was celebrated on the first new moon after the completion of the full lunar cycle at the end of the winter solstice. It is on this day that the Chinese celebrate their traditional new year, which now bears the name of Chunjie or the “Spring Festival”.

So, we answer the question of when the Chinese New Year. The traditional Chinese New Year is celebrated on the second new moon after December 21 (the day of the winter solstice). As a rule, this day falls between January 21 and February 21.Each new year is associated with one of the twelve animals, which becomes the symbol of the year. Here is a list of these animals:

  1. Mouse (or rat)
  2. Bull;
  3. Pig;
  4. Sheep;
  5. Tiger;
  6. Hare (rabbit or cat);
  7. Horse;
  8. Snake;
  9. A monkey;
  10. Cock;
  11. Dog;
  12. The Dragon.

How to celebrate the New Year in China?

As mentioned above, the New Year is a holiday of spring, and it symbolizes the awakening and resurrection of nature after the winter frosts. From this day the earth begins to revive and restore its fertile properties. Of course, such a holiday to this day remains the most revered in this country. Previously, the celebration of the New Year was delayed for almost 2 months and consisted of a series of various rituals. Now many of these ceremonies have lost their meaning and gradually disappeared, but, nevertheless, some traditions remain unchanged. For example, exactly at midnight, the whole sky over China is lit by festive fireworks, and there are explosions of firecrackers and firecrackers. It is believed that such a noise frightens away the wild beast Gonyan, because of which the land becomes barren.

As a rule, in the New Year the whole family gathers at one festive table, rich in treats, and all together watch TV, play board games and just communicate with each other.

Now you know when the Chinese New Year, and how it is celebrated.